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Three Educational Pathways to Good Jobs

The middle-skills pathway, including those with more than a high school diploma but no college degree, now accounts for about a quarter of all..

2 days ago

Three educational pathways to good jobs

While a BA is the surest pathway to a well-paying job, it’s not the only way. Learn more about the three pathways to good jobs in our video:..

3 days ago

There are more occupations, programs of study, college and universities, and students than ever before. Good thing our research is designed to help you untangle this complex web of opportunities. Learn more: bit.ly/2IzYrVg #CEWcelebrates10

test Twitter Media - There are more occupations, programs of study, college and universities, and students than ever before. Good thing our research is designed to help you untangle this complex web of opportunities. Learn more: https://t.co/Z2Zya3Y84C #CEWcelebrates10 https://t.co/GoQt37Rv71

Since 1991, good jobs in skilled services for workers on the BA pathway grew by 17.7M. Meanwhile, good blue-collar jobs for workers on the high school pathway declined by 1.5M. bit.ly/2A7fewr #GoodJobsData

test Twitter Media - Since 1991, good jobs in skilled services for workers on the BA pathway grew by 17.7M. Meanwhile, good blue-collar jobs for workers on the high school pathway declined by 1.5M. https://t.co/PT3mmwYIGm #GoodJobsData https://t.co/6FOdsyrVya

High college costs have left low-income students to resort to working while in school, which often means lower grades and prolonged time to graduation. @JonMarcusBoston profiles working students in the @Hechingerreport: bit.ly/2Cu9ui3

Between 1991 and 2016, good jobs for workers with BAs and graduate degrees doubled from 18 million to 36 million. Learn more: bit.ly/2A7fewr #GoodJobsData

Learn more about the 3 educational pathways to good jobs in our tweets this week! bit.ly/2A7fewr #GoodJobsData

The number of good jobs for workers on the BA pathway doubled between 1991 and 2016. See more. bit.ly/2A7fewr #highered #GoodJobsData

test Twitter Media - The number of good jobs for workers on the BA pathway doubled between 1991 and 2016. See more. https://t.co/PT3mmwYIGm  #highered #GoodJobsData https://t.co/szXM4Puv4k

Skilled-services industries accounted for 77% of job growth for workers with middle skills. Learn more: bit.ly/2A7fewr #GoodJobsData

test Twitter Media - Skilled-services industries accounted for 77% of job growth for workers with middle skills. Learn more: https://t.co/PT3mmwYIGm #GoodJobsData https://t.co/PAQfTtG875

While good jobs for workers with only a high school education still exist, many workers have gravitated toward the middle-skills and BA pathways. Read more: bit.ly/2A7fewr #GoodJobsData @JPMorgan

Shut Out of US Jobs Boom: Women Without a College Degree

In this CBS News article, Aimee Picchi writes about how women without a college degree are being left behind in the labor market, as middle-class blue-collar jobs tend to go to men. Picchi cites the Georgetown CEW report “Three Educational Pathways to Good Jobs: High School, Middle Skills, and Bachelor’s Degree.”

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Associate degree holders benefit most from ‘good’ middle-skills job growth

In this Education Dive article, Natalie Schwartz discusses how associate’s degree holders have reaped the most from job growth in middle-skills positions. Schwartz cites the Georgetown CEW report “Three Educational Pathways to Good Jobs: High School, Middle Skills, and Bachelor’s Degree.”

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The only thing more expensive than going to college is not going to college.

Anthony P. Carnevale
Director and Research Professor