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We are an independent, nonprofit research and policy institute that studies the link between education, career qualifications, and workforce demands.

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Use our interactive map of the U.S. to view state-level research on job projections, the economic value of college majors, and sector studies on healthcare, nursing, and STEM.

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“The White surge in college education sets up Whites for decades of continued economic dominance,” says Dr. Carnevale. Read more in the newest #CEWrelease: bit.ly/2mbMi2l

White workers are more likely than Black or Latino workers to have a good job at every level of education. Learn more: bit.ly/2mbMi2l

test Twitter Media - White workers are more likely than Black or Latino workers to have a good job at every level of education. Learn more: https://t.co/1yfFwiIYjk https://t.co/TG0OL8TsxC

White workers have a disproportionate share of good jobs compared to Blacks and Latinos. Read more in the newest #CEWrelease: bit.ly/2mbMi2l

Black and Latino workers with good jobs are paid less than White workers with good jobs at every level of education. Learn more: bit.ly/2mbMi2l

Even in the same jobs in the same industries, with the same level of education, men outearn women. Women still earn about 92 cents for every dollar a man makes. Read more: cnb.cx/2MaojdZ @CNBC

Most people make decisions about college without understanding what return they’ll get on their investment. Read more from Dr. Carnevale: bit.ly/32VtZOE

“Degreed higher education isn’t the only viable path into a good career. Oftentimes short-term certificates and industry-based certifications get the job done quicker, better, and cheaper,” says Dr. Carnevale. Read more: bit.ly/35Ak4zU

Middle-class students cite a number of reasons for putting off or not attending college, such as family obligations, gap years, and unpreparedness. 20%, however, say they just didn’t want to go. Read more: bit.ly/2OlFV8k @hechingerreport

It’s time to reduce the barrier of standardized test scores in #collegeadmissions to ensure more qualified Latino students have access to selective colleges. Read more from Dr. Carnevale: bit.ly/2oJ0iSk

Wealthy students enjoy many advantages throughout the college application process that lower-income students often don’t see—leading to vastly different outcomes. Read more from @CNBC: cnb.cx/2MB9kJa

White Workers Are More Likely than Black or Latino Americans to Have a Good Job — Even With the Same Level of Education

In this Marketwatch article, Quentin Fottrell discusses the racial disparity in who gets good jobs in today’s workforce. Fottrell cites new CEW release “The Unequal Race for Good Jobs” as well as “Born to Win, Schooled to Lose.” Fottrell also quotes CEW Director Anthony P. Carnevale.

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Women’s Earnings Drop After Having a Child—But Men’s Do Not

In this CNBC article, Abigail Hess writes about how the “motherhood penalty” contributes to the gender wage gap. Hess cites CEW report “Women Can’t Win” and quotes CEW Chief Economist Nicole Smith on occupational segregation.

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The only thing more expensive than going to college is not going to college.

Anthony P. Carnevale
Director and Research Professor