Reports

CEW explores the links between education, career preparation, and workplace demands. Our research focuses on jobs, skills, and equity with the goal of better aligning education and training with workforce and labor market demand.


The Way We Were: The Changing Geography of US Manufacturing From 1940 to 2016

Between 1940 and 2016, employment in manufacturing shifted across America from the Northeast to the Midwest and the Southeast.

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SAT-Only Admission: How Would It Change College Campuses?

If applicants were admitted to America’s top 200 colleges based on their SAT scores alone, more than half of enrolled students would have to leave. The new class, comprised of students with scores higher than 1250, would be less racially diverse and slightly more affluent.

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Upskilling and Downsizing in American Manufacturing

The glory days of American manufacturing in the 1970s—when workers with a high school diploma or less held 79% of the industry’s jobs—will not return. Instead, over half of the manufacturing jobs are going to workers with some form of postsecondary education.

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Born to Win, Schooled to Lose: Why Equally Talented Students Don’t Get Equal Chances to Be All They Can Be

In America, it’s better to be born rich than smart. The most talented disadvantaged children have a lower chance of academic and early career success than the least talented affluent children.

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Today’s higher education system is divided into two unequal tracks stratified by race and funding.

Our Separate & Unequal Public Colleges: How Public Colleges Reinforce White Racial Privilege and Marginalize Black and Latino Students

Today’s higher education system is divided into two unequal tracks stratified by race and funding.

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Three Educational Pathways to Good Jobs: High School, Middle Skills, and Bachelor’s Degree

The economy that once provided good jobs for young workers with a high school education or less now favors workers with at least some education and training beyond high school.

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Balancing Work and Learning: Implications for Low-Income Students

Low-income working college students face steeper challenges than higher-income students.

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Rocky Mountain Divide: Lifting Latinos and Closing Equity Gaps in Colorado

Colorado, one of nine states with more than one million Latinos, has the largest gap between White and Latino college attainment.

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Certificates in Oregon: A Model for Workers to Jump-Start or Reboot Careers

Certificate recipients in Oregon ages 29 or younger reap sizable earnings gains, in some cases more than doubling their pay, as they build their skills and enter the workforce, according to a new analysis of community college programs in the state.

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Five Rules of the College and Career Game

College is less about what college you go to and what degree you get but more about the returns of individual college programs.

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Women Can’t Win: Despite Making Educational Gains and Pursuing High-Wage Majors, Women Still Earn Less than Men

Despite great educational gains, women still need to earn one more degree than men to earn the same.

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Good Jobs That Pay without a BA: A State-by-State Analysis

The state-level analysis report shows that between 1991 and 2015 most states gained good jobs that pay without a BA and nearly half of all states added good jobs in blue-collar industries. The rise of skilled-service industries, such as financial services and health services, has also added good jobs. Strengthening the connection between school and work is crucial to preparing workers for the demands of good jobs in the new economy. 

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Latino Education and Economic Progress: Running Faster but Still Behind

Lagging college degree attainment has led Latinos to become stuck in the middle-wage tiers of the labor market. With the right support, however, Latinos are poised for a surge in educational and economic success.

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Nursing Careers

Nursing: Can It Remain a Source of Upward Mobility Amidst Healthcare Turmoil?

Nursing: Can It Remain a Source of Upward Mobility Amidst Healthcare Turmoil? A college education is key to success in a nursing career, with 66 percent of registered nurses having a bachelor’s degree or higher.

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Good Jobs that Pay without a BA

There are currently 30 million good jobs in the U.S. that pay well without a Bachelor’s degree (B.A.). These good jobs have a median salary of $55,000. This report shows that good jobs continue to grow, but they are changing from traditional blue-collar industries to skilled-services industries. A gain of 4 million good jobs in skilled-services industries, such as financial services and health services, has more than offset the 2.8 million good jobs lost in manufacturing.

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Major Matters Most: The Economic Value of Bachelor’s Degrees from The University of Texas System

This report finds that graduates from University of Texas System institutions out earn other bachelor’s degree holders not just in Texas but across the nation, demonstrating that a University of Texas education is a worthwhile investment in the future.

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Career Pathways: Five Ways to Connect College and Careers

Career Pathways: Five Ways to Connect College and Careers, calls for states to help students, their families, and employers unpack the meaning of postsecondary credentials and assess their value in the labor market.

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The 20% Solution: Selective Colleges Can Afford to Admit More Pell Grant Recipients

The nation’s most elite universities could enroll more low-income students without significantly hurting their graduation rates or budgets. If every college was required to have at least 20 percent Pell Grant recipients, more than 72,000 more Pell students would have to be admitted to 346 colleges and universities.

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America’s Divided Recovery: College Haves and Have-Nots

Over 95 percent of jobs created during the recovery have gone to college-educated workers, while those with a high school diploma or less are being left behind. This report reveals that those with at least some college education have captured 11.5 million of the 11.6 million jobs created during the recovery.

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African Americans: College Majors and Earnings

While college access has increased among African Americans, they are overrepresented in majors that lead to low-paying jobs. African Americans: College Majors and Earnings shows that African Americans, who represent 12 percent of the U.S. population, are underrepresented in the number of college majors associated with the fastest growing, highest-paying occupations.

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